When To Use This Or These In A Sentence?

When to use these and those in a sentence?

Generally speaking, we use this/these to refer to people and things, situations and experiences that are close to the speaker or very close in time.

We use that/those to refer to people and things, situations and experiences that are more distant, either in time or physically..

How use these in a sentence?

These sentence examplesAre these bears here? … How long would these mind games go on? … You’ll have to show me these beautiful flowers. … These are my other two daughters, Dulce and Alondra. … “Can one be calm in times like these if one has any feeling?” said Anna Pavlovna. … I’m talking about the safety of these people.More items…

When would you use than in a sentence?

Than is used in comparisons as a conjunction, as in “she is younger than I am,” and as a preposition, “he is taller than me.” Then indicates time. It is used as an adverb, “I lived in Idaho then,” noun, “we’ll have to wait until then,” and adjective, “the then governor.”

What is the meaning of this and that?

phrase. If you say that you are doing or talking about this and that, or this, that, and the other you mean that you are doing or talking about a variety of things that you do not want to specify. ‘And what are you doing now?’ —’Oh this and that. ‘

Where do we use this and it?

(It refers to the situation in the sentence.) We use this or that to refer to something with special emphasis – indicating an interesting new fact has been mentioned.

What is difference between those and these?

Similarly, if you the things are close to the speaker you should use “these,” and if they are away you should use “those.” Notice that the time will also influence the usage of “this” and “that” as a demonstrative pronoun. If something happened in the past, the usage of “that” is more appropriate.

What does than mean?

more, less, and fewerthan(Preposition) introduces a comparison, and is associated with comparatives, and with words such as more, less, and fewer. Typically, it seeks to measure the force of an adjective or similar description between two predicates.

What are this and that in grammar?

from English Grammar Today. This, that, these and those are demonstratives. We use this, that, these and those to point to people and things. This and that are singular. These and those are plural.

What is difference between this and that?

The words ‘this’ and ‘that’ are demonstrative pronoun which is used for indicating something. … We use the word ‘this’ to point out a person or object which is close to you. On the other hand, ‘that’ is used to point out a person or an object which is farther from you.

What kind of word is their?

Their is the possessive pronoun, as in “their car is red”; there is used as an adjective, “he is always there for me,” a noun, “get away from there,” and, chiefly, an adverb, “stop right there”; they’re is a contraction of “they are,” as in “they’re getting married.”

How can I use better in a sentence?

Better sentence examplesBetter stop by and get Howard Spencer. … We’d better go down for breakfast. … I suppose no place is better than home on Christmas. … I feel much better now. … He seemed in better spirits than usual and awaited his son with great impatience. … He thinks you are better than us. … I thought it would be better if I slept here.More items…

Is it rather than or then?

“then” have very different uses. Then is commonly used to express a sense of time or what comes next or used to be. Than is used to form comparisons between two things. So correct option is “Rather than”.